Colorful mural featuring several children playing games and music.
11.12.18
As Forecast Public Art wraps up its 40th year, we join the celebration by sharing out some of the useful, valuable resources they produce for artists and creative placemakers—free of charge. As this milestone anniversary year comes to a close—and in the holiday spirit of giving—we at ArtPlace wanted to share out a few of the many top-shelf resources Forecast offers to the public (or has in the works), all free of charge. To expand its efforts to build the diversity of artists and consultants working in public art, Forecast launched GroundWork, a first-of-its-kind training program for the next generation of public art consultants of color.
Close up of Elena Serrano
06.12.18
Elena Serrano of Oakland’s EastSide Arts Alliance & Cultural Center reflects on the threats and opportunities people of color face in her city as development accelerates—and the role arts and culture can play in working toward racial justice. Our Humans of ArtPlace series takes its cue from the famed Humans of New York project. This month, as our blog tells stories of “the people behind creative placemaking,” we asked the driving forces behind three ingenious ArtPlace-funded projects to give us some personal insights on work, life, art, and place.
Images from the OkuPlaza Fest in DC featured in the Crossing the Street Zine.
04.12.18
An introduction to some of the many useful creative placemaking resources produced by our friends at PolicyLink, The Trust for Public Land, The DC Office of Planning, and Transportation for America. Just in time for year-end highlight reel season, ArtPlace is pleased to share some top takeaways from the session “Creative placemaking tools: What exists? Where are they? What’s missing?,” which took place on May 22 at the ArtPlace 2018 Annual Summit in Louisville, Kentucky.
29.11.18
Community policing can seem like a great idea, but how can local precincts bring it to life when punitive models of law enforcement are so entrenched? Fargo Community Trust Officer—and rapper—Michael Bloom has a few ideas. While the concept of community policing isn’t new (its roots stretch back to 19th century London), implementing it in modern day America has been difficult for many communities. Even if local precincts agree on the tenets of the philosophy, they can struggle to find ways of enacting them.
Donna Neuwirth co-founder of the Wormfarm Institute
27.11.18
Our Humans of ArtPlace series takes its cue from the famed Humans of New York project. This month, as our blog tells stories of “the people behind creative placemaking,” we asked the driving forces behind three ingenious ArtPlace-funded projects to give us some personal insights on work, life, art, and place. Donna Neuwirth co-founded the Wisconsin-based Wormfarm Institute in 2000, and remains its executive director.
Tawna Little, member of the Maskoke collective Ekvn-Yefolecv
20.11.18
Our Humans of ArtPlace series takes its cue from the famed Humans of New York project. This month, as our blog tells stories of “the people behind creative placemaking,” we asked the driving forces behind three ingenious ArtPlace-funded projects to give us some personal insights on work, life, art, and place. Tawna Little is a member of the Maskoke collective Ekvn-Yefolecv (“E-gun YEE-fol-EE-ja”), an Indigenous group who has reclaimed some of their ancestral homelands in what is now Weogufka, Alabama.
Doug Naselroad, Master Artist-in-Residence at the Appalachian Artisan Center
15.11.18
Our Humans of ArtPlace series takes its cue from the famed Humans of New York project. This month, as our blog tells stories of “the people behind creative placemaking,” we asked the driving forces behind three ingenious ArtPlace-funded projects to give us some personal insights on work, life, art, and place. Doug Naselroad is a Master Artist-in-Residence at the Appalachian Artisan Center (AAC), where he oversees all aspects of the luthiery (stringed instrument) program.
Mari and Maya make a wish doll at The Special Project. Photo credit Lafayierre Mitchell
13.11.18
This is the second in a series of guest posts by Judi Jennings called “Asking Tough Questions About Creative Placemaking.” Her posts highlight analysis and action ideas from interviews with some of the best minds in placemaking and philanthropy. How can storytelling transform public safety “hotspots” into community “bright spots”? How can mural-making elevate and protect the humanity of parents who are incarcerated? And: who is left out when creative placemaking seeks to improve public safety?
Close up of Anne Koller in a white t-shirt
08.11.18
After a year of doing projects around the country, I am in Summit Lake (Akron) celebrating the League of Creative Interventionists year of work with the community. As the sun sets over the lake, it creates a picturesque view of a 200 person dinner filled with residents, leaders and, Knight Foundation and Reimagining Civic Commons Directors. I wonder, “ Why the f*#k am I not doing this work in my own city, in my own hood? ” I knew in that moment it was time for me to come home.
Five men walking towards the camera
06.11.18
The words “artist” and “bureaucrat” can seem as opposite as the north and south poles. But poets, actors, musicians, dancers, and art-makers of all other stripes have been infiltrating our government’s ranks for years—and many are making great strides. In this story series, we’re visiting with accomplished artists who hold leadership roles in their cities about their dual callings, how their creative lives relate to their public service, and what the arts can bring to good government. Pete Muldoon is the Mayor of Jackson, Wyoming as well as a vocalist, keyboardist, guitarist, songwriter, and bandleader of the band Major Zephyr...
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